2 Basket Game Situation Rebounding Drill

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Drill 2 Basket Game Situation Rebounding Drill
Drill Nickname Game Rebounding
Central focus of the drill Rebounding
Number of players required 8
Most appropriate age range(s) Middle School, High School, College or Above

Intro

A difficult aspect of coaching the skill of rebounding is simulating the infinite scenarios under which a rebound or box out can happen. Here in this drill we look a two basket drill that attempts to put players in situations that they may encounter in a live game.

Execution

Teams of two, one defense, one offense.

Defensive rebound = 1 point, offense must leave to the other basket.

Offensive rebound = No score, defense must leave to other basket. Offense becomes new defense.

2BasketReb-00.jpg

Drill emphasis

  • Initiating contact: The player to initiate contact is often the one who will gain the advantage in leverage allowing them to get to the rebound first.
  • Duration : The duration of a boxout differs based on the distance and angle to the hoop, but the general consensus is "Hit, Hold, and Go!".
  • Court/Spatial Awareness - Understand where you are on the court and where your matchup is. In some cases the boxout will be nearby, in others you may have to close distance to stop an offensive rebounder from crashing to the middle.

This drill sets up at two opposing hoops with two different alignments.

The first alignment has two offensive players on the wings with two defenders closely guarding in denial one pass away.

The Coach has the basketball and moves around the perimeter to the either side above the key and looks to shoot. Defenders must hit, hold, and go to find the basketball using proper Rebounding Fundamentals.

2BasketReb-01.jpg


The second drill sets a player in denial position, and one player in Help Defense based on where the Coach moves along the perimeter. Players should continue to rotate in proper help formation til the shot goes up. The player in help position will have a longer distance to close in order to stop the offensive player from crashing. The player on the ball must quickly initiate contact, box out, then turn and find the basketball.
Another option is to have a second coach/player as a skip option. This forces quick closeouts to proper defensive position and gets players moving prior to having to box out.

2BasketReb-02.jpg